Jaldapara
 

Jaldapara  


Jaldapara National Park is situated at the foothills of Eastern Himalayas in Alipurduar Sub-Division of Jalpaiguri district in West Bengal and on the bank of river Torsa. Jaldapara is situtated at an altitude of 61 m. and is spread across 216.51 kmē of vast grassland with patches of riverine forests. It was declared a sanctuary in 1941 for protection of the great variety flora and fauna. Today, it has the largest population of Great Indian One Horned Rhinoceros in the state, an animal threatened with extinction and is a Habitat management area.

River Toorsa runs through the Sanctuary. The forest is mainly savannah covered with tall elephant grasses. The wild life, in addition to one-horned rhinos, consists of Royal Bengal Tigers, wild elephants, deers, sambhar, barking deer, spotted deer and hog deer, wild pig, bisons and a number of birds, peafowls. Elephant ride is arranged for viewing of wild life preferably at dawn.

Jaldapara

Nestled in the heart of the picturesque Dooars, is the habitat of the rare one-horned rhinoceros, the mighty bison, the spotted deer, the barking deer, huge tuskers, fearsome wild boars and a variety of birds and animals.

The park opens to visitors throughout the year except from 15 June until 14 September. During the period from October to May, and particularly March and April, new grass starts growing.

Activites

Khairbari Leopard and Tiger rescue center

This rescue center houses the animals rescued from circuses and are rehabilitated before being released into the forest.

A battery operated vehicle will take you inside the dense enclosure of the leopard rescue center. It is an extremely fulfilling sight to see the animals take to their natural habitat.

Jungle Safari

Jungle Safari

An adventurous elephant ride in the morning will take you deep inside the grassland for the real excitement. The sights of rhino in a muddy pond, the herd of elephants or the running deer are the thrilling experiences in Jaldapara.

Totopara

Totopara

Adjacent to the sanctuary is another major attraction for those interested in ethnic tourism. Totopara is the only settlement for the Toto tribe, one of the most endangered ethnic communities in the world. Their numbers are now reduced to a mere thousand. Lots of initiatives have been taken by governmental and non-governmental agencies for the improvement of their living conditions. However, to live with them and to observe their traditional culture can still be a precious experience.

Chilapata Forests

Chilapata Forests

Hidden deep inside the Chilapata Forests the ruins of a thousand years old fort of Nala King has a tremendous historical and archeological importance. The ruins consist of a broken wall and a broken gate of the fort. Built in the 5th century during the Gupta Empire the ruins still recall the memories of the Golden Age. Because the site is not maintained properly, it has now become a playground for leopards, snakes and other animals. However, digging up the ruins to extract the unheard tunes of the past might destroy the present ecological balance of the forest. It is wise to leave it to the competent authorities to decide whether we should compromise the present and the future to gather the wisdom of the past. The forest also contains a unique tree that "bleeds" like humans. The fluid that comes out is blood-like in color and density. A stand of the trees is located just few meters outside the broken gate of the old fort. According to the locals of that area these trees are 100–200 years old and are not found anywhere in the world. These trees are only a few in number and are yet to be given a botanical name.